bodies and leakage, which one????

Discussion in 'Talkback' started by avalongirl, Jan 14, 2006.

  1. avalongirl

    avalongirl New Member

    My husband and I are going tomarrow (Sunday) to possibly purchase a 2004 Four Winds Hurricane, I am under the impression that the body is such that leakage from the exterior top is something of the past, as opposed to a 2000 Fleetwood Flair, the Fleetwood's top looks like perhaps it COULD have a leakage problem. We currently have an 83 Georgie Boy/Excaliber, that we had sealed (top exterior) already 4 years ago, and leaking like crazy! I know that it's older than GOD, but the leakage thing scares me considering we are going to invest some monies. By the way, the two I mentioned, the 2004 Four winds 35,000 miles, and the 2000 Fleetwood 25,000 miles are the same price. ANY AND ALL ADVICE VERY WELCOME!
     
  2. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    bodies and leakage, which one????

    Leaks from the top are not something from the past IMO. Tops should be checked regulary and resealed often. Movement, twisting, temperature changes will cause sealing to crack and rain water is an ace at find these cracks. Windows, vents and mouldings also need resealing often.
     
  3. avalongirl

    avalongirl New Member

    bodies and leakage, which one????

    isn't the body style different on the four winds? what does Vac-bond laminated roof, walls and floors, and welded tubular aluminum roof and side wall cage mean? :blush:
     
  4. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    bodies and leakage, which one????

    Try this site http://www.writerstew.com/ws47.html for an explanation on vac bond. it's just a process the mfg uses. Go to some of the rv web sites to get a picture of the caged construction. The cage will have more studding than just aluminum structure. Some bolt the aluminum and some weld. Some claim the structure needs to give a little and like bolting and claim the weld will break. Others claim the bolts will work loose and a good weld will not break. I like the caged construction and weld units. Think you will find they will be a little more pricer.
     
  5. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

    bodies and leakage, which one????

    You don't say which Fleetwood product you are comparing to, but Four Winds is not a high quality motorhome, only mid range in market. There are usually reasons when you see price differences like that. And the Four Winds is not more, or less likely to develop leaks than is which ever Fleetwood product that you were looking at. You need to do more comparing of quality and less listening to the stuff that some sales rep. is shoveling.
     
  6. Grandview Trailer Sa

    Grandview Trailer Sa Senior Member

    bodies and leakage, which one????

    Gulf Stream uses Vacuum Bonding in a lot, if not most, of their units both MH, 5th's and some trailers. It is a process where the outside wall is laid on a huge roller table. A spray of glue is applied, the aluminum frame and styrofom insulation is laid on the wall, another spray of glue and then the interior wall is laid down. The whole wall is moved into the Vacuum Bonding machine where about 550 lbs. of pressure is applied and vacuum is pulled, like sealing food for long term storage. The wall or roof or floor sits there under pressure and vacuum for about 50 minutes. When it comes out the wall is cured, dry and ready for use.

    Most manufactures don't have this machine since it costs about 1.3 million. Most assemble the wall like I said and move it through rollers that pinch the wall to spread the glue out. It is then laid out to dry on its own. Huge difference and I think vacuum bonding is best.
     
  7. s.harrington

    s.harrington Senior Member

    bodies and leakage, which one????

    Actually I have found that it doesn't matter which type walls and roof you have if you get a leak it all delaminates. And thoughs who think FourWinds is anything but entry level is wrong(my opinion,don't get mad. I feel the same about a lot of manufacturers who want to be classified as better than entry level). But people should be told that depending on how much time you spend on the road, the roof should be checked every 12 months or more often. All my customers know this though some don't do it.
    It is very criticle here in western Washington where it rains 280 or more days a year.
     

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