DC Converter...

Discussion in 'Class C Motorhomes' started by dragon, Mar 19, 2011.

  1. dragon

    dragon Junior Member

    Hi
    I just got back form getting my RV inspected. Most everything is okay/working, except the DC converter and having a hole in the gray tank. :blackeye:
    I know that the gray tank can be patched, no problem there.
    I own a 1976 Dodge Cobra that I plan on using later on.
    I do not know much about DC Converters. :blush: From what I gather, the converter runs the electrical lights and other items, inside. I could use some advice on what to buy in regards to the DC converter.
    What brand is relyable?
    What amps should I be looking for?
    So, I am looking for your advice.
    PLEASE????????
     
  2. akjimny

    akjimny Senior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    Karen I have (I believe) a 65 amp converter in my 31 foot motor home. You need to make sure you buy a big enough converter to power all the 12 volt items in your RV (lights, fans, refrigerator, if it is a 3-way)
    and charge the batteries. You also need to be sure you get an "intelligent" converter so you don't overcharge your coach batteries.

    Some converters just provide a constant 13.6 volt charge rate to the batteries. This constant rate charge will cause the batteries to sulfate over time. Then they won't take a charge at all. An ""intelligent" converter will charge the batteries, then drop off the charging rate to a float rate that won't overcharge the batteries. Some high end converters also have a reconditioning mode. See Triple E's post in the Talkback section for more info.

    Hope this helps some. :) :) :)
     
  3. dragon

    dragon Junior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    Is there a difference between Inverter and Converter?
    What am I looking for DC-to-Dc, AC-to DC, DC-to-AC ??? I was told: DC Converter.
     
  4. dragon

    dragon Junior Member

    RE: DC Converter...

    OOPPS....
    Just go t done wating RV Doctor's clip on Converters.

    New question: How many amps should I look for? Amps: 60, 65, 80, 90? Would Higher amparage be a waste or is the higher the better?
     
  5. akjimny

    akjimny Senior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    Converters change 120 volt AC to 12 volt DC to power your RV and charge your batteries when you are plugged into shore power.

    Inverters change 12 volt DC to 120 volt AC to run things that need AC power when you are NOT plugged into shore power. WARNING - Inverters require a lot of power to work and will suck your 12 volt batteries dry in a heartbeat.

    How many amps should you get. Look at your dead converter and get one at least that big or a little bigger. Don't go smaller. The RV manufacturer (probably) put in the smallest, cheapest converter he could get away with. Bigger is usually better. JMO ! ! :) :)
     
  6. dragon

    dragon Junior Member

    RE: DC Converter...

    Thank you for your advice! It was very helpful.
     
  7. dragon

    dragon Junior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    Okay Ladies & Gents, I need more advice from those who have bought and installed a DC Converter themselves. I want to know: (1) what the best converter is (Inteli) ? (2) I am replacing a dead 45 amp and am looking at a 70 or 80amp option, does anyone have a AC-to-DC Charger/Converter higher that 55amps? DO you know of any trouble/problems that should be addressed before installing such a high amps? I have read that campsites offer 30 or 50 amps, Would this be a problem having a higher amperage? From what was posted, I Know I need a Inteli DC Power converter/charger that offers three settings and supplies protection.

    After web reading information, I have some reserve feelings regarding what warrenties 2 or 3 years offered. Does the converter get replaced that often?
    I have run into some products that die after the warrenty time(within 30days after warrenty experation). Since I will be spending alot on a new converter, I would like to know that I am getting a reliable product. SOOOOOOOOOOOOO, Whatcha got??? And Have you had any problems with conveter/charger?
     
  8. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    Karen the 30 and 50 amp cg service will have nothing to do with what size converter yu have. You might also ck to see if maybe your converter just has a blown fuse. Most will have a fuse on the outside you can replace. There is also one inside that you can replace but you have to remove the rivets that hold the converter together and then soldier the inside fuse in to replace it. A 55 amp should serve you well. Even another 45 should be ok unless you have installed some other 12 volt appliances or more batteries.
     
  9. dragon

    dragon Junior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    Nash:

    I am looking to replace my"DEAD to the World" original DC Converter (stated "DEAD" by service repairman inspection). I what to be able to use interior lights, TV, ect.. with out having trouble. What I am finding out is, there is a $10 difference between buying a 55amp, a 60amp or a 70amp or 80amp DC Converter.

    Since I never bought/used a converter before, I would like one that I do not have to worry about.

    I sat down and estimated that if I had everything runninga at one time, I would need between 75 to 110amps at worst case which leads me looking at the higher DC converters. I get a feel that most people (after reading the forums posted in all threads) have approx 50-55 amps DC Converters. I am trying to decide if spending $139 on 55 amp or 60amp vs $149 on 70amp would make good difference, or play it safe and go $197 for 80amp or 90 amp DC converter. This is my first time buying a converter and I do not what to make a mistake amd short myself by going with a lower amperage, or make a mistake and buy higher amperage and find out that I can not get Camp service (have not been out yet, will be first time). I can not ask previous owner because they never used the RV.

    There is a large generator, and I only have 1 Deep cycle battery in a 23ft RV.

    There are hardy any articles out there addressing the difference between amperage use, except http://rvservices.koa.com/rvinformation/rvmaintenance/rv-converters-and-amp-draw.asp.

    Given that I have not used an RV before and do not really have a solid reference point, I am extremely heisted to junp in and buy the same voltage that was in the RV. That is why I am asking RVers what they have and what their opinion is. This would give me a good bases on which way to go. I have had advice on which accessories to look for, but not on the differiences in amperages, with the exception to "get same or go bigger".
     
  10. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    Karen the converter has nothing to do with the tv and 110 volt appliances. It converts the 110 volts to dc volts to keep the battery charged and runs the 12 items when pluged into shore power. The 55 amp will serve you IMO. I have a 55 amp in my MH and its fine. My MH is also 50 amp service shore power. Agin the 30 amp or 50 amp cg shore ac power has nothing to do with the converter.
     
  11. akjimny

    akjimny Senior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    Karen, I know I told you if "Some are good, more are better" but I think 80 or 90 amp service would be too much. You would have a bunch of unused circuits in that big a panel. I have a 50 amp converter/service panel in my 31 foot MH and it does the job just fine.

    I copied this from the WFCO website. This is what I have:

    WF-8930/50 50 Amp Distribution Panel

    The 8930/50 Series can be a 50-amp or 30-amp AC distribution center. It has 15 available DC, and up to 12 AC branch circuits. The 8930/50 can be coupled with any of the WF-9800 switch mode converters with 55, 65 or 75 amps, which gives engineers more flexibility in product design.

    The WFCO 8930/50 Series distribution center comes with the WFCO Two-Year Limited Product Warranty.

    These distribution panels have many features desired by the OEM and retail customers, and have been tested by the Underwriters Laboratories® (UL) to meet both the US and Canadian standards. Our 9800 Series converters used with the 8930/50 centers are designed to comply with FCC Class B, assuring quiet operation and non-interference with other appliances.

    Nominal 13.6 Vdc output voltage of the switch mode 9800 Series converter is easier on electronics, motors and other appliances. There is no need for the battery to be inline to filter the circuits.

    Specifications:
    UL® and cUL®-Listed. FCC Class B

    Warranty period: Two Year Limited Product Warranty

    Input: 105-130 VAC, 30-amp or 50-amp AC service

    Dimensions: 13.75” wide; 9.5” high; 4” deep
    Weight: 3.75 lbs.

    Too bad the picture didn't copy and come across, but you can see it at their website. This has the circuit breakers for the AC service and a 12 volt fuse panel for the DC circuits. I think this might be what you are looking for. Hope this helps. :) :) :) :)
     
  12. H2H1

    H2H1 Senior Member

    Re: DC Converter...

    well done Jim, well done
     

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