fifth wheel

Discussion in 'General RVing' started by sretaw, Feb 27, 2005.

  1. sretaw

    sretaw New Member

    We just purchased a 5th wheel that lists dry weight at 7646 and hitch weight at 1705. My intent is to purchase a Ford 250 ext. cab, long bed to replace my 150. The max 250/3.73 axle tow weight listed by Ford is 9700 lbs for the ext cab. We never travel with anything in the black/gray or fresh water tanks and I can't see how I would ever put 2000 lbs in the trailer/truck combination to exceed the 250's limits. Any comments and does anyone have an extimate on mpg.Thanks
     
  2. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    fifth wheel

    Flyer is this the uvw listed inside your 5th wheel? Amazing what we think we just have to have when going camping and the weight can add up pretty quick. Think you should be ok though. Probably around 10mpg towing but your driving habits can really affect mpg.
     
  3. sretaw

    sretaw New Member

    fifth wheel

    Thanks for the reply Chelse. The 7646 is the factory published weight. I'll have to wait until the unit is delivered to see the actual weight but it should be close. I'll be satisfied with 10mpg as that was what I got with my 150 towing a 25' TT. I'm perfectly satisfied with 60mph on the interstate, as a quote I have on my wall states "I have no time to be in a hurry." We're looking forward to getting on the road with it.
     
  4. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    fifth wheel

    Dry weight is not to be trusted, as it may not include all the options installed in the unit. If you order the unit directly from the factory, this might not apply, but once the dealer gets his paws on it... When buying a trailer, use the GVW of the trailer, as that is the maximum amount allowed, and is a reliable absolute value (of course you can exceed it, but then the trailer is in trouble in addition to the truck :).

    Toting around a lot of water and/or sewage is usually a bad idea, true, but some might be necessary. Unless you always drive for a short period of time and then stay in a place with full hookups for a long period of time, you may find yourself towing with some fresh water and some sewage, with the attendant weight.

    Why would you want to have some fresh water? In case you stop to have lunch, use the facilities and/or stay overnight in a place which does not have hookups (either planned or unplanned). If you are going someplace without hookups for a few days, you may even need to fill the tank before you get there.

    Why would you want to carry waste? You wouldn't, but sometimes it is appropriate. Generally you don't want to dump your black tank until it is at least a third full and your grey tank is also at least a third full (to rinse out the hose after the yuck goes through it). And if you have only been in a place a short while, those tanks might not be 'full enough' to dump. Or if you are in the 'boonies' for a few days, you might not be able to dump until you get back to civilization towing with full tanks (at least the fresh water tank should be empty by then :).

    So it is wise to allow enough extra weight capability for at least a 3rd of a tank of fresh water, and the same for both black and grey water.
     
  5. sretaw

    sretaw New Member

    fifth wheel

    Good points C. I'll just have to make sure I pull under the trucks limits which will also be under the trailer limits. One reason I'm leary about liquids in the tanks while traveling is that with my 25" TT a weld holding the cross brace under my black water tank broke loose and I was fortunate to see it early.
     

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