hitching?

Discussion in 'Talkback' started by irrevsuz, Aug 17, 2004.

  1. irrevsuz

    irrevsuz New Member

    My Husband and I are both disabled. We have 31' TT. One thing that slows us down some is that we have had to get someone to do the hitching and unhitching. What's on the market that would make this task possible for people with limited strength and dexterity?

    Thanks,
     
  2. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    hitching?

    Hi Suz & Gary, there are electric tongue jacks, I see on e-bay there is a hitch aligner, its a V shaped adapter the goes on the tow vehicle hitch and as you back up it slide the trailer hitch over the ball. The little walkie talkie radios really are a big help, and a good 18 VDC cordless drill with an adapter for cranking up the stabilizer jacks are a good deal, hope this helps with some ideas, and others will have other suggestions. Welcome to the forum. :) :laugh: :cool: :bleh: ;)
     
  3. irrevsuz

    irrevsuz New Member

    hitching?

    Well, we're actually pretty good at aligning. It's the physical attaching and snapping on and off of the sway bars that's hard for us.

    Thanks!
     
  4. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    hitching?

    Oh sure I never even thought about the sway bars etc. I can see that would be a problem, right off I don't know of any easier way. I haven't towed a TT for a number of years and never used wt. dist & sway bars etc so don't think of it right off. Have you considered a pull-rite hitch, I know they are spendie but every now an then a good deal on a used one comes along. :) :laugh: :cool: :bleh: ;) :approve:
     
  5. Ed H.

    Ed H. New Member

    hitching?

    The Pull-Rite spring bars are actually a little harder than normal ones to hook up, or so I've heard.
    There is a very simple trick to snapping up the spring bars on your hitch. Use the tongue jack (preferably electric) to raise the rear of the tow vehicle and front of the trailer to a height (this sometimes requires a block under the jack..use EXTREME caution if you use one) that will alow you to close the snap up brackets by hand. Then let the jack down and you're ready to go. *The one thing you have to be careful about is to chock the front wheels of the tow vehicle or the trailer wheels so it won't roll*. Putting the transmission in Park locks the rear whels of your truck and lifting the back end of it can lead to a hair-raising misadventure.
     
  6. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    hitching?

    Boy that goes to show how out of TT towing Iam I mistakinly thought that the pullrite didn't use spring bars :dead: , never mind my previous post :(
    :) :laugh: :cool: :bleh: ;) :approve:
     
  7. mrt57mrk

    mrt57mrk New Member

    hitching?

    I don't know if this will help much, but if you use a longer cheater pipe when cocking your spring bars, you'll find it easier to pull them up into the locked position. The longer bar gives you more leverage thereby making it easier. Just be careful not to let it slip from your grasps part way up, if this happens it could smack you pretty good.
    Ed's little trick works very well too, but as he stated, use extreme caution when hitching that way. Good luck to you, and I hope you'll find one of these tips that will work well for you.
     
  8. irrevsuz

    irrevsuz New Member

    hitching?

    Thanks, everyone, but we decided to go to a Class A motorhome. Much easier, and already handicap accessible.
     
  9. janicenlarry

    janicenlarry New Member

    hitching?

    Irrevsuz, think the class A is the best idea especially if you can find one already equipped. I know that you can order them with provisions for handicaps i.e. extra wide doors, lifts, etc. Saw some being made the last time I visited the Winnebago factory.
     

Share This Page