Need Used Motor Home Help

Discussion in 'Full Timing' started by RoadScribe, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. RoadScribe

    RoadScribe New Member

    :cool: Previously I've owned a travel trailer for full timing.
    This time I want to go a different route by purchasing a used MH and
    towing a small car behind on a trailer.
    Hey, I need help in this department.
    *What to look for in a used MH for one person with a home office to
    live in and work out of without robbing the bank.
    I am blessed with a good mechanic in San Antonio that can check it
    out for me.
    *How do I learn to drive one of these baby's, maintain and tow a vehicle behind it.
    Please help steer me in the right direction.
     
  2. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    Need Used Motor Home Help

    What kind of traveling will you be doing and what will be the use of the MH? Do you have a length in mind? How many $$$$ are you planning on spending? Need a little more info to give much advice. Listen to all as there will be different opinions (which makes this a great rv forum)and then make up your own mine.
    Look for one that has been well maintained and has no water damage. Check the CCC to be sure it has the ability to carry everything you need. Ck the tow rating. You probably won't need a slide if only one person will be living in it but resale tends to be better on the slide models. On the other hand you can purchase a non slide cheaper.
    As far as learning to drive you can attend a rally that gives driving lessons but if you have ever driven a large truck there is not a lot of difference. Learn to watch your rear view mirrors and swing a little wider at sharp turns. A rear monitor is a must (IMO) for backing. Monitor tire pressure and keep them inflated to proper pressure for the load. Replace the tires if they are 5 to 7 year old REGARDLESS of tread. Tires have a production date on the sidewall.
     
  3. RoadScribe

    RoadScribe New Member

    Need Used Motor Home Help

    Thanks for the reply. Since I'm a Home Health Hospice nurse working in local and travel networks in addition to writing, I could be anywhere the work takes me. So think: high milage, in different climates. That includes spending winters in the Four-Corners area if called upon to work for the BLM. So I'm leaning toward a 26 ft. Born Free or Big Foot with good four season endurance that I can also mount solar panels on top to boondock and pull a car trailer.
    I have time to window shop and learn. Maybe hunt a good used model, repo or closeout. Just gotta find them.
    DM
     
  4. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

    Need Used Motor Home Help

    It sounds as though you are thinking of a class C. If so, you may also want to consider the Lazy Days. It has a great reputation as do both of those you mention. But, if you expect very high mileage, then you may want to think diesel and those are very rare in class C motorhomes. Big block gas engines usually have a life of about 150K to possibly as much as 200K. A diesel in modern motorhomes will usually have a life for 300K or more. But the diesel is difficult to find in a class C and is much more expensive in a class A.

    On the tow car, why not think in terms of a car that you can tow behind the motorhome on it's own wheels? That will do away with the extra weight of the trailer and the problem of where to store it. Also, few class C motorhomes or gas powered class A's will have the ability to deal with the tongue weight involved by could tow the car if on it's own wheels. I think that would be a much better way to go.

    On learning to drive it, for a class C there isn't a lot to learn, just get used to the extra size. For towing you of course must allow for the extra length as well as the track of the towed vehicle. A class A is a bit more challenging but modern motorhomes are really not at all difficult to drive and if you take your time you can easily adjust. There are classes in driving them, but most of the classes are located in Calif. or at the RV rallies.
     
  5. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    Need Used Motor Home Help

    Of course, if you use a motorhome and towed vehicle, you will have 2 drivetrains to maintain, and 2 insurances. It may be worth the costs for the conveniance if you spend more time travelling than you do staying. If you go to one place and stay a while before moving on, you might want to check into a trailer and tow vehicle as an alternative.
     

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