New RVer

Discussion in 'General RVing' started by Glenn Riccio, Feb 18, 2003.

  1. Glenn Riccio

    Glenn Riccio New Member

    Hi, My wife and I are planning a move to Washington State next year.We are interested in buying a 5th wheel rig and suitable pickup truck.
    We intend to travel the country and see the sights on our way to Washington from here in Mass. When we arrive at my land in Washington, we intend to live in the RV until our house is built.
    I have just started looking at used RV's and it seems there are alot of good ones out there. I'm considering a 30 footer size?
    What type of truck would be suitable for it? We intend to be traveling up through the Rockies, Canadian and U.S. so the truck must be up to the task. Any and all advice pro or con will be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Glenn :laugh:
     
  2. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    New RVer

    If you are going to be going up steep grades, you probably will need to go with a diesel engine. For going downhills, an exhaust brake may be useful. With only 2 of you, you could get by with a standard cab, but the 'king cab' is so very useful, I'd never go back to standard. Short beds require special hitches to reduce the chances of the trailer running into the truck during sharp turns; long beds don't usually have these problems. 2 wheel drive requires less maintenance and can tow more, but the 4 wheel drive can come in handy at times. Dual wheel rear axles provide more weight capability and possibly stability, at the cost of slightly less traction (don't understand why that would be, but that is the claim), harder parking and possible crabbing in sharp turns, and more and more difficult maintenance, not to mention requiring more tires (although it is claimed they don't wear as fast). The size truck to get depends on the weight of the trailer. Too much truck is a good thing...

    Before buying the RV, you may want to check out the RV registration costs in Washington. It appears to be 'value based', which can be punitive on newer models. Of course, if you are living on it and it is not on the road, you may be able to avoid registering it.
     
  3. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    New RVer

    Hi Glenn, we have been to Alaska and all over the western US with our 30' 5th wheel and presently with our 34' MH all powered with gas engines Ford 460, had no problems in the mountains, while some can pass me its no big deal as I tow 60 / 65 MPH and enjoy the trip am not racing to be first. I would say a heavy duty 3/4 ton or I prefer a 1 ton dually, if your looking for a good used truck a PSD or Dodge with a cunnims is good but any of the big block gassers will also do the job the 460's V-10's 454's or the newer GM 8.1. My dad towed a 22' 5th wheel all over the west with a Ford 300 six while he didn't set any speed records he didn't have any problems and they enjoyed their trips very much. John covered it pretty good. As for the dually yes unloaded they can have less tracsion, in ten years with mine it has never been a problem, I can attest to the fack you get better wear out of the tires on a dually, so tire cost is a wash, parking is another thing, you have to have a larger spot. I guess I don't understand crabbing in sharp turns. Good luck. :) :approve:
     
  4. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    New RVer

    Gary, aint that what the wife does when you go around the curves to fast :) . Glenn, I vote for the dually.
     
  5. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    New RVer

    'crabbing' - if you are turning sharply, the inner wheel is traveling a shorter distance than the outer wheel. Since they are tied together, one must slide over the ground rather than roll. Probably not a major problem since the small amount of time it applies may not add appreaciable wear.
     
  6. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    New RVer

    Hi John now I understand can't be a big deal as I said am getting 50% more tire wear with the dually. Your 6L must do you pretty good with your trailer, I have a friend that tows a 28' Excel with his and hes real happy with his truck.
    Yes Chelse I think your right-on and that concerns me more. :eek:
     
  7. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    New RVer

    My 6L works very well on the flats and downhill. However, it labors going up any grade at all. So far has not been intolerable, except going from Abiline to Albuquerque, which is not all that steep. So I have concerns about any 'real' hills.
     
  8. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    New RVer

    Hi John, while it may not seem like much of a grade, that is one heck of a pull your talking about there, near Clines Corners, NM the elevation is 7000' Albuquerque is 5000', couple of those hills just west of Santa Rosa are really tuff, its slows everybody including semi's. Been there many times done it. :) :cool: :approve:
     
  9. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    New RVer

    If Clines Corner is 7000 and Albuquerque is 5000, then going west would be downhill, no? I was having trouble going west. Maybe it was coming to CLines Corner from Texas where I was having problems.
     
  10. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    New RVer

    Yes John, but the down hill doesn't start for real untill your about 30 miles from Alb. and you are usually fighting a head wind to boot. The elevation of Abilene is 1738' so its a hike up the hill. So you shouldn't be too hard on the GMC, and that coming from a Ford man boy I'm just getting to be sooooo nice in my old age. :) :laugh: :cool: :bleh: :approve: :eek:
     
  11. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    New RVer

    1738 up to 7000 is a bit of a climb. Maybe I was too hard on the poor GMC.
     

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