New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

Discussion in 'RV Tips & Tricks' started by baloo33, Jun 16, 2004.

  1. baloo33

    baloo33 New Member

    Hello all,
    I just purchased a 29ft wildcat by forest river tt. I will be towing it with an expedition. Many of my co-workers own rv's and love it. I cant wait to take delivery of it. I am just wondering if any of you have any suggestions of things I need to purchase for my first trip. I am aware of chock blocks and leveling blocks but not sure about other necessary or luxury items that will come in handy.

    Thanks,
    baloo
     
  2. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    First of all, the hitch, perhaps weight distribution or the 'PullRite' which makes a TT tow like a 5er (allegedly). Next, brake controller and the correct wiring connection between the truck and the trailer.

    Being paranoid, I make sure I alway have all part of the hookup locked, so no part can easily be disconnected or stolen, whether or not I'm hooked up.

    Next, you need the 'hook up' kit. This is a set of 'dogbones' to hook up your trailer to any likely source of power (15/30/50 amp, a surge suppressor and a power line monitor are also good, but expensive, things here), possibly an extention cord (30/50 amp or possibly 10ga 15 amp), stuff to connect to any likely source of water (4 ft and 25 ft DRINKING WATER hose at a minimum, a WATER PRESSURE REGULATOR, a few assorted angle connections to reduce stress, some spare washers, perhaps a special nozzle to fill your freshwater tank, preferably an inline water filter, hose end caps to keep out the dirt and bugs) and stuff to connect to a sewer (2 10 ft hose sections - the stiffer the better, clear angle connection to the trailer valve, sewer pipe angle, plastic/rubber gloves, probably some means to flush out the tanks).

    You can expand (and probably will) on this hook up kit. In particular, you may want to have some TV cable and/or phone cable. Inside, you need to get some toilet chemical (if you use it).

    How's that for a start?
     
  3. baloo33

    baloo33 New Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    Sounds like a good start. I have been looking at the sewer stuff but was unsure. I appreciate your time and response. One good thing about it, I have until next month to pick it up so I can get everything togeather.

    Baloo
     
  4. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    Sewer stuff is perhaps the most difficult to get. There are many options, some of which don't 'play well' with the others. And even stuff which works when you start out, often develops leaks over time.

    The best system I have found is a green, flat hose from 'Level UPP'. I had to order it special through a store, as I've never seen anyone who carries it. 2 pieces of hose (10' each) and the swivel connector will handle most common scenarios, and mate up perfectly with the 'blue' univeral sewer pipe connector on the far end and any good clear elbow on the trailer end. This has never leaks, but you have to 'walk' the goo to the dump site, cause it doesn't work well with hose supports, and laying on the ground, is lower than the elbow. I got it because it was very compact and claimed you could even drive over it without damage (but I'm not going to try that).

    The rest of the 'blue' (Prest-Fit, I think) system works pretty good, except that I haven't yet found a way to attach it to the trailer without getting leaks (their bayonet fitting fits loosely). I've been playing with a chunk of 'Rhino' hose with a Prest-Fit fitting on one end and a bayonet fitting on the trailer end, but the fittings leak a bit between hose and fitting. Perhaps a silicon sealant might take care of that...
     
  5. rlmurraysr59

    rlmurraysr59 New Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    Your new trailer will probably come with a 25' electric cord. Buy at least another 25' for spare. You will be surprised at how many campgrounds didn't use good common sense when laying out the hook-ups. I also carry another heavy duty extension cord, 12 gauge wire, and an adapter, just in case the only electrical supply is a common wall plug. You can't run the air conditioner or micro wave but you can watch television or make a cup of coffee.

    Buy some covers for the tires. UV rays dry rot and crack tires that are not being towed all the time. The new tires are not as bad but it still isn't good for them. A can of non-petroleum based silicone lubricant to spray the seals around your slide-out. Keeps them pliable and helps make a good seal. Also plan on washing the rubber roof, if so equipped, at least twice a year with Murphy's oil soap. I use a pump up sprayer and a scrub brush and then lots of rinse water. If you need to reseal any joints after a while use Devcon, I think that is the name, not caulking that you use around the house. You can buy it at dealers and it stays pliable. It also finds its own level after it is applied. I keep a tube just to be prepared as I go over my unit. I hate water leaks.

    Velcro, hook & loop, sticky type. Your wife is going to want to put out some little momento's, or maybe you will to, and packing them away everytime will get boring. Or picking them up off the floor. A little piece of velcro in a strategic place will hold them on the shelf or whatever as you travel down the road. Can help keep pictures on the wall, but not very good by itself. Usually have to mount a screw.

    A couple of the best investments I ever made, if your unit is not so equipped, was an electric tongue jack to raise it when unhooking, and wheel locks that fit between the trailer wheels when parked. Secures the trailer and helps reduce the rolling of the trailer as you walk around inside. They are easy to install or remove and I liked them better than the wheel chocks.

    You might also have a sway bar installed with your torsion hitch. Helps reduce the effect of passing a semi or being passed.

    If I think of anymore I will reply again. I am sure I have missed something.

    I made up a checklist one time and used it until I was comfortable. Most folks rip the tv antennae off the roof at least once. The checklist kept me from doing it so far. And always put one corner of the awning down before you retire for the night or leave the trailer. An unexpected rain storm can fill an awning and ruin a vacation. They aren't cheap either.

    Make sure you abide by the rules of the road or camping. Usually the dealership can give you a copy of them. One that I always practice when driving on a two lane road is that when I see a line of cars behind me, I find the first safe place to pull off and let them go by. I know how aggravating it is to follow a big slow moving vehicle so I am not going to aggravate someone else. Plus, I never get in that big of a hurry anymmore anyway. Afraid I might miss something.

    Have a great camping experience.

    RonSr.
    '02 Southwind 37U/Workhorse
    '01 GMC Sonoma towed w/Brake Buddy
     
  6. baloo33

    baloo33 New Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    Thanks for your response everyone. This site seems to be full of experience and knowledge.

    :)
     
  7. mrt57mrk

    mrt57mrk New Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    Hello baloo, lot's of good stuff posted up there for you. My two cents will be directly on towing. As mentioned above a weight distributing hitch & sway bar was recommended. This is not an option but a MUST!! Your Expedition has a shorter wheelbase than an extended cab pick-up.Shorter wheelbase = more sway. I bought a Husky weight distributing hitch and the anti-sway friction bar to go with it. This okay, but still got some sway to fight, I then read some info on the new Reese Dual-Cam high performance sway control system. Turns out it's only a little more expensive than what I bought, while being a much better system. Friction bar type sway controls try to fight sway after it occurs, Dual Cam HP prevents it from ever getting started. I was very lucky, the trailer place i bought the husky stuff at was willing to give me back full price for everything I bought & order the Reese complete set-up with the Dual-Cam High Perfomance set-up, what a difference!! Brake conroller i bought is the prodigy, also worth it's weight in gold! Enjoy your new Trailer , safe miles to ya :)
     
  8. Magnumto

    Magnumto New Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    Thanks for the great question, baloo. I'm in the same situation and really appreciated all the info from the responses. Also, thanks to the responders!
     
  9. turnipbwc

    turnipbwc New Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    Now for my two cents. There has been four (4) travel trailer wrecks here on Interstate 70 this year alone. All were single vehicle accidents and all were pulled by short wheel base vehicles. The last was just last month and was being pulled by a Ford 250 pick up but was a short wheel base. The local newspaper quoted the State Highway Patrol Trooper that was at the wreck sight that all four whecks were pulled by short wheel base vehicles and 3 of them were using tag-a-long hitchs. My advise is to trade that Expedition in on a long wheel base extended cab pick up truck. I own a 2001 Silverado extended cab with the long wheel base and have no problems. Just make sure you get on with pleanty of horsepower.
    Thanks for leting me add my two cents and Happy RVing.
    turnip42

    quote:Originally posted by baloo33

    Hello all,
    I just purchased a 29ft wildcat by forest river tt. I will be towing it with an expedition. Many of my co-workers own rv's and love it. I cant wait to take delivery of it. I am just wondering if any of you have any suggestions of things I need to purchase for my first trip. I am aware of chock blocks and leveling blocks but not sure about other necessary or luxury items that will come in handy.

    Thanks,
    baloo
     
  10. dareman

    dareman New Member

    New to Rv'ing taking suggestions

    Like you, we are new RVers, too. We just gradutated up from a tent trailer which we used with much pleasure for many years. BUT, I'll have to admit that the RV (25' Sprinter trailer) is that much better.

    When I got it in August I added the usual accessories (good quality sewer hose, slideout awning, hoses, and fittings of various sorts). But the one "doo-dad" that I like best is the clear plastic angled connector that goes between my main trailer sewer outlet and the sewer hose itself. It allows me to see what is coming out, and when it is all out. It also incorporates a standard water hose connection that allows hose flushing. Also, if you have a straight shot into your black tank, it will flush it out nicely. The Sprinter has a bend in the sewer pipe leading into the black tank so all I can do is flush the hose, but that's a very clean situation with this little jewel. It's a dandy addon.
     

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