Tires & Winter Storage

Discussion in 'RV Tips & Tricks' started by Chief2, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. Chief2

    Chief2 New Member

    I have seen some RV's stored with the tires up on wooden blocks(not for leveling purposes). I have also heard that you should jack your RV up so the tires are off the ground (Concrete in my case). Is this neccesary? Does setting on concrete for the witer months effect the tires? If you have any experiance let me know. :question: :question: :question:
     
  2. turnipbwc

    turnipbwc New Member

    Tires & Winter Storage

    I can only speak for myself. I have the tires on my RV pulled up on pieces of wood and a jack under the front and read bumpers just enough to take the weight off the tires and springs. The tires could dry rot if it sat for a long period of time. Also have it in the barn out of the weather where I have a woodburner and just finished waxing it today. Good day to do it here, it was 4 below zero last night.
    turnip
     
  3. ARCHER

    ARCHER Senior Member

    Tires & Winter Storage

    I use my rv all winter (in sunny South), but I do jack my boat trailer up and leave it up so the tires are off the ground. I treat the tires and cover them loosely. :laugh:
     
  4. Del Roy

    Del Roy New Member

    Tires & Winter Storage

    Those in the tire business state that it is best to have a vapor barrier between your tire(s) and the ground or concrete. Plastic or sheet metal has been recommended and place it so that water can not be on top of the barrier. The moisture 'must' be kept away from the rubber if it is to be stored for a 'long' period of time.

    I personally have not done the above except for a short time with one of my motorhomes, but definitely will try it when my diesel pusher arrives.
     
  5. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

    Tires & Winter Storage

    Del Roy is correct about the moisture barrier. Also, cover the tires with something to prevent the sun from striking the tires as it too will cause them to age more rapidly.
     
  6. RaeDar

    RaeDar New Member

    Tires & Winter Storage

    Quote: "Plastic or sheet metal has been recommended and place it so that water can not be on top of the barrier."

    If you place the plastic or sheet metal under the tires, how do you prevent water from getting on top?
     
  7. turnipbwc

    turnipbwc New Member

    Tires & Winter Storage

    Only way I know is to cover the whole RV. I took a 3"x 8" and cut a slope on one end and drove my RV up on it, front and rear wheels. That should keep any ground water from the tires unless there is a great downpour.
    I guess I am one of the luckier one's and keep mine in the barn summer & winter. I still keep it off the ground in the barn. I also use old jacks I had and put under the front & rear bumpers (piece of wood between bumper & jack) and take the weight off the tires and springs.
    turnip42
     
  8. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

    Tires & Winter Storage

    quote:If you place the plastic or sheet metal under the tires, how do you prevent water from getting on top?

    There are several ways to do this. Best would be for the tires to be resting on some solid material such as pavement where the water will drain away. If that isn't possible, then use wood blocks large enough to not sink into the ground so that the tires will be above the grade level and still drain. The plastic, or other water proof material goes in between. A concrete pad will absorb moisture and hold it in contact with the tires. That is the reason for the barrier.
     
  9. Chief2

    Chief2 New Member

    Tires & Winter Storage

    Thanks for the tips. Next winter I will be setting the tires up so that water will not stand under them. And I will cover them from the sun. You have all been great help. :laugh: :laugh: We are going out on our maiden voyage Thursday. :approve:
     

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