Trans temp gauge

Discussion in 'Class A / Diesel Pushers' started by Martin Brenneke, Jul 30, 2006.

  1. Martin Brenneke

    Martin Brenneke New Member

    I have a 2004 Workhorse chassis with an 8.1 chevy and an Allison 1000 trans. where would you install a trans temp sender in the trans and what parts would you use? Any info would be helpful. Marty.
     
  2. Martin Brenneke

    Martin Brenneke New Member

    Re: Trans temp gauge

    :) :)
     
  3. Grandview Trailer Sa

    Grandview Trailer Sa Senior Member

    Re: Trans temp gauge

    I don't know the answer to your question, but might be able to point you in a direction to go. A trans. temp. gauge is standard in a GM pickup with the Allison Trans. Go to a GM dealership and ask them. Bet a mechanic could show you.
     
  4. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    Re: Trans temp gauge

    I like them installed in the pan because this is the temp of the oil as it is pumped into the working parts of the trans. Some install in the cooler line. Most any major parts will have them and performance stores will also sell them with directions. Go with what GTS said and ck with chevy dealer.
     
  5. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    Re: Trans temp gauge

    Been second thinking myself and thinking now that it might be better to have the sender in the line out of the trans going to the cooler. That way you would know the temp of the oil after going through the guts of the trans. Hmm be great to have two gauges. One in the pan and the other in the out line. Bet it would show a slipping trans.
     
  6. dbarton291

    dbarton291 Senior Member

    Re: Trans temp gauge

    Having the gauge in the "to cooler" line will show the hottest point in the system. It's that temperature that is the best indicator of transmission fluid life. Many of the electronically controlled transmissions of today have a sump (in the pan) temperature sensor. That sensor is intended as an input to the control system, and as a diagnostic indicator of the temperature of the transmission itself. However, to monitor the temperature the fluid is really exposed to, the "to cooler" point is still the best.

    If at the "to cooler" port the fluid sees 300 deg F, but you're monitoring a sump temperature of 250 deg F, you'll never really know the fluid is breaking down.
     
  7. tmarrs

    tmarrs New Member

    Re: Trans temp gauge

    You have my interest - I never knew the temp of the fluid increased with age. I just had the fluid changed in my coach, and the temp runs between 175-200 on the digital guage. What temp should I look for that would indicate a fluid change and/or problem?
     
  8. dbarton291

    dbarton291 Senior Member

    Re: Trans temp gauge

    I was not very clear. The temperature of the fluid does not increase with age. What I mean is the hotter the fluid runs, the shorter the fluid's life. Fluid run at 300 deg F will oxidize and break down way before fluid that runs at 200 deg F. Running 175 - 200 in the to cooler line is very good. Fluid change intervals should be as per the transmission manufacturer's recommendations.

    300 deg F is a point at which Dexron fluid breaks down very quickly. It's a temperature it can only stand intermittently. On the Allison retarder models, they are allowed 330 deg F intermittently, but only because it's a retarder and they normally have a huge tube and shell water/oil cooler in the system to cool the oil back down very quickly.
     

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