Computer Help

#1
One thing I've wondered about is how many people are using laptops on the road? We are going down to Mexico with both of our laptops and I'm surprised at the number of sites that offer wireless. Of course I don't expece it in Mexico :( but going through the US should be a breeze.

If anyone ever needs some techie help, let me know. I'd be glad to help.
 

Kirk

Senior Member
#2
Computer Help

There are getting to be more RV parks with wifi all of the time, but it is still much less than half, probably more like 1/4 of them at most. Of those, many also charge extra for use of it.

To your first question, we travel with two laptop computers, an internet dish on a tripod and a wireless router so we can both be on line at the same time and we can send files between the two computers as well. We keep a back-up of all important files on the hard drive of the other person's computer.
 
#3
Computer Help

Kirk, have you ever tried adding a couple of network wires and a switch to that system? That way you will operate at the max speed of the sat dish while you're "hooked up", but still have the roaming capability of the wireless (but with lower throughput.)
 

Kirk

Senior Member
#4
Computer Help

Cloudhopper?

What do you mean? I guess I don't understand. We are both wifi enabled so when we are where there is free wifi we do use that but not through the router. Also, most of the time the wifi is actually faster than the dish.
 

profsci

Junior Member
#6
Computer Help

Have you considered verizon broadband access? Its not wifi, its EVDO (your laptop is actually "talking" to a cell tower, instead of a wifi router). You can access from virtually anywhere you can use a verizon cell phone. It costs $60 / month (if you have a verizon cell phone), but its unlimited use and it could be cheaper than what you end up paying for wifi when you take out daily or hourly memberships at various campgrounds.
 
#8
Computer Help

BroadbandAccess - Based on CDMA EV-DO (Evolution-Data Optimized) technology

* Verizon Wireless, the first to build a national wireless broadband network, launched BroadbandAccess in October 2003 and announced a national rollout in January 2004.
* Offering wireless Internet connections at broadband-like speeds.
* Covering more than 150 million Americans, coast-to-coast.
* Download complex files and large email attachments easily at average speeds of 400-700 kbps. Speed claim based on network tests with 5MB FTP data files, without compression. Actual speeds and coverage may vary.
 

hertig

Senior Member
#9
Computer Help

I just got the Cingular card. Yesterday, I was clocked at 64K (50K is average dial up). Today, they are supposed to roll out the high speed access locally, so we will see...

Most, if not all, companies have at least 2 classes of service. 1) 'broadband' speed is only available in certain cities. 2) Outside the broadband area is a slower speed. 3) Some companies connect at (slow) dial up speeds in the even more outlying areas. This may be 'roaming' on another network, but most companies have a 'no roaming/unlimited usage' program.

The contenders I looked at were Verizon, Cingular, Sprint and Alltel. Cingular was the only one who claimed to offer Broadband in Tucson (as of June 1, anyway). I've been told T-Mobile has this service too, but couldn't find any info for some reason.
 
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