Winterization

#2
Winterization

Winterizing isn't difficult. First, be sure the black and gray water tanks are emptied, if your trailer has them. Then drain the fresh water tank, either through its drain, if it has one, or with a siphon hose. Where shore water hooks on, you can screw in the little plug available at Wal Mart and elsewhere that has what looks like a tire valve on it. Hook a source of pressurized air, either tank or compressor, to that. Open all faucets in the trailer, including the shower, if you have one, and blow the lines until you know nothing but air is coming out of the faucts. It doesn't take a lot of pressure, but more than a little. Also hold open the flush valve on the stool, if you have one until you hear air and not water coming from it. Then, put one cup of the pink antifreeze for RVs, available at Wal Mart and elsewhere, in each drain, sink, tub, bathroomm sink, and a final one cup in the stool without flushing. You're now winterized as far as freezing is concerned.

It would be well to wash a couple of cups of the pink stuff into the gray and black water tanks too. Then disconnect the battery and check to see if it has enough water in each cell. Check tire pressures. Open refrigerator doors a bit and put wadded up newspaper in freezer and main compartment to absorb moisture and smells. It would be good, also, to stop by the trailer once in a while during winter and open it up on warm days to let a little fresh air in.

Then, sit back by the fire and begin reading those travel guides for next season.

Enjoy!

Vern M.
The Little House on the Higwhay (tm)
www.runningriver.com/modeland/littlehouse.htm
 
#4
Winterization

I remembered later in the day I left the hot water heater out of the description above. On the face of it, to the left of the burner, is a six-sided plug. Unscrew and drain. Leave the plug off until you are ready to power up again. And when refilling, realize there will be a head of pressure in the heater. It is good to leave the plug loose when recharging the water supply until water is flowing freely through the drain hole, then tighten it up while leaving the hot water faucets inside open to push that air bubble out.

Happy RVing!

Vern M.
The Little House on the Highway (tm)
www.runningriver.com/modeland/littlehouse.htm
 
#7
Winterization

Hey Vern, if I get one of those blow outs from Walmart will a small DC power tire pump be enough to blow the lines out and will a tire pump fit on the blow out your talking about from Walmart? Could a bicycle tire pump work?
 
#8
Winterization

Yes, the Wal-Mart blow out plug is what is needed. I imagine the little motor-driven pump would put enough air in there to displace the water. I don't know if you could with the old hand pump, though. I'll give it a try some time and report back.

Thing is to put enough air into the lines that you no longer get or hear water coming out of any open faucet, drain point, etc.

I use my air tank. It has 80-100 pounds of air pressure in it when I begin and I let it go down to around 30-40 pounds.

Vern M.
The Little House on the Highway (tm)
www.runningriver.com/modeland/littlehouse.htm
 
#9
Winterization

I don't take chances with blowing out with air. I blew with air last fall and then ran pink stuff. There was clear water that came out of each faucet before it turned pink. I suppose it depends on what state you're located in. In MN I would sure use the pink antifreeze. RV dealers always use the pink stuff here in MN. Make sure you do the ice maker and W/D if you have them.

It takes a lot of work to find and replace broken water lines if they were frozen. Lot less work to run pink stuff.
 

C Nash

Senior Member
#10
Winterization

I have used both methods here in Alabama and never had a problem. Some people don't like the RV antifreeze in their water lines even though it is not poison. DO NOT USE AUTO ANTIFREEZE. I have poured auto antifreeze down the drain for protection. Real simple to winterize with the rv a/freeze. Drain the h/water heater, should have a by pass valve to by pass heater, put a tee in the inlet of your rv water pump with a hose, I installed one on mine with a shut off valve and ran the hose out underneath my rv, to insert in the gallon rv a/freeze, turn pump on and open faucetts one at a time until you see the pink and don't forget the commode, attached sprayer and shower. If you run each faucett and commode it takes care of the drains, black and gray tanks. Drain fresh water tank and wait for spring if you can. Most fresh water tanks will not drain completly so you may want to add a quart to the tank. I use about 2 gallon (not in tank) total. If you do not by-pass the hot water heater you will need around 5 gallon of course it all depends on the size of the RV. All JMO

Chelse L. Nash
fulltimer03@yahoo.com

Edited by - c nash on Oct 22 2001 10:31:10 PM
 
#11
Winterization

I understand that the RV antifreeze is good to use and that you can use it in your water heater, but the anoide will or could get damaged. Is thsi the only thing that can happen to the whole water system if you use the RV antifreeze in everything? Let's say it eats up your anoide, can it do anything else harmful to your waterheater?
 
#12
Winterization

Good advice all!!:) Almost time to at least begin thinking about this again; or, just go where it doesn't get cold enough to worry about it. Just thought that i would bring this up, seeing as how winter will be on us soon enough. JMHO





John
42' CC Affinity Tag 2000
'88 Ford Escort LX
 
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