Alternatives Anyone?

Discussion in 'General RVing' started by DL Rupper, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. DL Rupper

    DL Rupper Senior Member

    I don't know about you, but I'm tired of hearing about ALTERNATIVE energy . My diesel runs on diesel fuel. I can sure buy allot of diesel fuel even at $5.09/gal (Washington) for the cost of a NEW vehicle that runs on Alternative ???? whatever's. My ol Dodge hasn't pulled my RV up any hills with windmills or solar panels lately. Time to do some thing beside talk about pie in the sky. :dead:
     
  2. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    Now DL, don't you think that it is about time to start collecting used cooking oil to burn in the thing?
     
  3. Shadow

    Shadow Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    Agree with you 100% DL.. Drill our own and start building some refineries.
     
  4. elkhartjim

    elkhartjim Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    Only one problem....environmentalist. Sandpiper might get a drop of oil on it or the walrus may have mating season disturbed.
    80 billion barrels off California. More than that in Alaska, Rockies. I'm hoping they will drill my lease soon. Probably will mess up the deer hunting but it won't bother the wild hogs. Dang it.
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    well for u that don't read the news ,,, bush released all the restrictions on drilling,, but it still has to go to congress for the final vote ,, but ,, get this ,, the big oil company's are all for it ,, now i wonder why HMMMMMMMMMMM :eek: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
     
  6. Grandview Trailer Sa

    Grandview Trailer Sa Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    There is finally a debate about how "great" the hybrids are VS cost. Going to be on my local news tomorrow night.

    I know my 2001 Pontiac Bonneville is paid for and only has 60K on it. It gets 23-25 in the city and has gotten 32 on the highway. I cannot see buying a new car, with a payment, and only gaining a few mpg's.
     
  7. H2H1

    H2H1 Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    Hey Rod could it be $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$, but I don't care how much they make a s long as the gas /fuel get a lot lower than what it is now. I know it is cramping alot us who would like to get out more. :(
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    u'r right ,, Hollis ,, but i think even when they start drilling ,, and it will be a long time ,, we still will not see the drop in fuel prices ,,, it's their way of making up for the lost in the drilling area ,, but then agian fuel was (in my parts) diesel 4.49 then 4.79 (today) ,, gas 3.82 then 3.97 (today) and to think oil went down ,, but the rpices went up ,, and to think at both pf the stations close to me ,, they have not got a new load of fuel since the weekend ,, and now they are upping the prices ,, it's gouging ,, i tell u ,, but to the gig oil it is not ,, it's the expense of the above ,, so go figure ;) :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :angry: :angry: :angry: :angry:
     
  9. TexasClodhopper

    TexasClodhopper Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    There is no quick solution. Not one. No "alternative" is available at this time or at any time in the near future.

    The excuse for NOT drilling in certain areas has ALWAYS been that it would not bring about a quick solution. That excuse has been used for the last 20 years. So, the drilling solution is always 10 years away.

    If we do nothing but allow more drilling, we will not have alleviated the problem with refined fuel. We need to lift the bans on refinery construction at the same time. Then when new oil supplies become available, we will also have the refining capacity to take advantage of it.

    Please note the one leetle tiny point that our illustrious and edumacated lawmakers neglect to inform you of (and you should question them about it unless you want to continue to be a pawn in this game they play.)

    They neglect to inform you that once more drilled-for oil is available there is nothing to keep that new supply from just being sold into the available market at prevailing rates. We could still be left buying oil from the Mideast, while our increased domestic production is sold on the open market to whomever has the bucks to buy it.

    Surprise!
     
  10. H2H1

    H2H1 Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    Good point Tex, never thought about that part. Like you said that never did mention as what they will/can do with the new oil. :(
     
  11. utmtman

    utmtman Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    You got that right Tex, that is what I have been trying to say all along. Good gosh what good is drilling if we have no place to refine it. All that is going to do is put more oil on the market for foreign interests.
     
  12. H2H1

    H2H1 Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    Good point Lee
     
  13. elkhartjim

    elkhartjim Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?



    This won't solve the problem, but it helps.Press Release[​IMG] close [​IMG]Motiva Celebrates Groundbreaking for Largest Refinery in United States10 Dec 2007[​IMG]

    Dignitaries scheduled today at site of future 600,000 barrel-per-day refinery include U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman



    Motiva Enterprises LLC today will officially break ground for its recently announced 325,000 barrel-per-day (b/d) refinery expansion in Port Arthur, Texas. The expansion will increase the refinery’s crude oil throughput capacity to 600,000 b/d, making it the largest refinery in the U.S. and one of the largest in the world. The upgrades and modernization will lead to new supplies of transportation fuels for U.S. markets, add jobs to the local economy and decrease the refinery’s ozone precursor emissions from present day levels.

    Commenting on the construction groundbreaking, Welte said: “This is a major milestone in the journey to meet our nation’s growing energy demand. By adding 325,000 barrels per day capacity, the expansion is equivalent to building a new refinery.”

    The expansion will bolster energy security in the U.S. by strengthening the supply of gasoline, diesel, aviation fuels and high quality base oils. The new production capacity is expected to be online in 2010 and will increase Motiva’s supply of Shell-branded fuels to the company’s wholesale and direct supply markets. In all, the refinery will produce about 23 million gallons of transportation fuels per day.
     
  14. Buckeye Chuck

    Buckeye Chuck New Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    I wonder how much oil is used to generate electricity? Maybe we should allow more nuke and wind powered power plants. This will free up oil for our fuel hungry tow vehicles. Also alternative fuel cars and other vehicles will also help. There is a place for alternative fuel vehicles. Anything we can do to explore ways to decrease our dependency on oil is GOOD. Less oil used for these applications leaves more for us RVers. I think that the answer is not drilling for more oil but finding ways to use less. Bring down demand, bring down price. A GOOD thing anyway you look at it.

    -BC-
     
  15. TexasClodhopper

    TexasClodhopper Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    I don't mean to be personally confrontational, Chuck, but that attitude is exactly how we got where we are now. What do you mean that the "... answer is not drilling for more oil ..." Our basic national security depends on importing LESS oil. Of course we can try to REDUCE our use of oil, but the fact is that as we do that oil gets cheaper, and it will be an economical energy source once again. It is self regulated as a market based item.

    There's no way we can ever remove our dependency on oil. We had this discussion 20 years ago and the predictions then were for what we have now. I was in the business and remember it distinctly. We saw the future then, and now we are living it.

    Most electricity is generated with coal. Some 20% is probably generated by nuclear depending on the area. We built a nuke plant south of Houston some time back. I think it took 20 years from start to finish to get it online. Very complicated and with a lot of public scrutiny and comment. It took a partnership of municipalities and other investors to bring it in. More than half of them sold out before it came online.

    (I hate to say it, but the French model of nuclear power is the most viable. They are the most experienced, too.)
     
  16. utmtman

    utmtman Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    I only know of water, coal, and wind power for electricity. Who or what is using oil?
     
  17. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    Actually, a major share of electricity today is generated burning natural gas.
    In 2007:

    * 48.6 percent of our nation's electricity was generated from coal. Nuclear energy produced 19.4 percent. Natural gas supplied 21.5 percent. Hydropower provided 5.8 percent of the supply. Fuel oil provided 1.6 percent of the generation mix. Other renewable resources, such as geothermal, solar, and wind, provided 2.5 percent, with other miscellaneous sources providing the balance.
    * The following amount of electricity, in gigawatt-hours (GWh), was generated from the nation's fuel mix:
    o Coal: 2,020,572 GWh
    o Nuclear: 806,487 GWh
    o Gas: 893,211 GWh
    o Hydro: 241,319 GWh
    o Fuel Oil: 65,708 GWh
    o Other renewables (geothermal, non-wood waste, wind, and solar): 102,988 GWh
    o Other: 29,230 GWh
    From: http://www.eei.org/industry_issues/industry_overview_and_statistics/industry_statistics/index.htm
     
  18. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

  19. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    According to NationMaster.com the consumption of oil by country for the top ten is:

    #1 United States: 20,730,000 bbl/day
    #2 China: 6,534,000 bbl/day
    #3 Japan: 5,578,000 bbl/day
    #4 Germany: 2,650,000 bbl/day
    #5 Russia: 2,500,000 bbl/day
    #6 India: 2,450,000 bbl/day
    #7 Canada: 2,294,000 bbl/day
    #8 Korea, South: 2,149,000 bbl/day
    #9 Brazil: 2,100,000 bbl/day
    #10 France: 1,970,000 bbl/day

    The Energy Bulletin has a lot of interesting numbers and some facts about who is buying oil products and where the trends in consumption are.

    http://www.energybulletin.net/node/45594

    There are many other places with a great deal of information on the subject. You might be amazed the amount of information one can find by plugging "US Oil consumption" or "US Electricity generation" into Google or your favorite search engine.
     
  20. Shadow

    Shadow Senior Member

    Re: Alternatives Anyone?

    Ok Tex, do you think the recent drop in the price of oil is because of Bush's executive order or just a coincidence. The news reports it's a drop in demand.
    Do you see it continuing to drop or are the speculators fixing to make another run?
     

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