bus conversions

Discussion in 'General RVing' started by Stu1, Aug 22, 2002.

  1. Stu1

    Stu1 New Member

    I am interested in purchasing a bus conversion. Could anyone give me some advice. I was looking in the yhe 1970-1980 range. I have seen a couple of sites with coaches that I could afford ranging from $20-$7000. Most of those were useing 2 strokes with manuals but a few had auto trans. Are there certain models that I should stay away from. Most were mci and provost. Any info would be greatly appreciated
     
  2. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    bus conversions

    Stu1,
    Got my dumb hat on. Are you sure they are two stroke? Course, I'am not to familiar with the diesels. Saw a site where they custom built units and really made some good looking units. Will try to relocate it.

    Chelse L. Nash
    fulltimer03@yahoo.com
     
  3. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    bus conversions

    Hi Stu, you must be looking at and talking about the older GM/Detroit 6-71 and 8-71 engines which were 2 cycle diesels, but were the main stay for GM for many years. The 6-71's were about 235 HP and the 8-71 was 290 to 330 or more, they are old work horse engine, no electronics not praticulally fuel efficent, both are super charged (not turbo charged) with GM blowers. I think (not sure)the manual tranny bus's are 3 speed are ok on hard surface but not the best on drit/gravel. Its been a few years since I reseached bus's so maybe wrong on some things, one thing we didn't like is the bus's tend to be very narrow, if you go to google and type in bus conversions you should find some site with information. Good luck & happy trails GB



    Edited by - Gary B on Aug 24 2002 8:21:16 PM
     
  4. lookn-ahead

    lookn-ahead New Member

    bus conversions

    The old Detroit diesels were two stroke. They built a V-8 that had a lot of power (I believe that it was 318 hp) and would wind up very quickly. The 1973 road tractor I had was turbo-charged and it lubricated through an oil line in from the crank case. The problem was that when the bearing in this thing went out the oil went directly into the airflow and the engine, causing the engine to "run-away". That is the reason Detroit Diesel put a large ball in the air supply line between the air breather and the intake to shut a runaway engine down. Had to choke them down to stop them. Good engines, but not nearly as dependable as the old 250 and 270 six cylinder Cummins. Had a road tractor with 250 Cummins that had nearly a million miles on it when we sold it, and it was still running strong. The Detroits would get better than 100k but with higher maintenance costs
    More information than you wanted to know I'm sure, but us old guys get to remembering and wish we was young again.
    doc
     
  5. Gary B

    Gary B Senior Member

    bus conversions

    Boy lookin ahead, you hit the nail right on the head there, at least the part about remembering! OH well guess I've got more toys and a little more time to play now. Happy trails GB
     
  6. Stu1

    Stu1 New Member

    bus conversions

    Thanks for the great tip on google. Found lots of good info there.
     

Share This Page