Camper and tow vehicle

Discussion in 'Beginning RVing' started by NINA, Mar 26, 2007.

  1. NINA

    NINA New Member

    Purchacing a 28ft Salem TT bunkhouse. The weight inside the
    cabinet door that the dealer and I looked at puts the trailer at 5210.
    We are towing with a 1991 F-150 V8. Attached is a class IV hitch.
    Too much camper :question: Dealer seems to think we are ok.
     
  2. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    Re: Camper and tow vehicle

    Nina, i would guess you are near or a little over rated towing after you add everything else in the camper and truck. What rear axle ratio do you have and does the truck have a towing package, trans cooler? Where and how far will you be towing?
     
  3. Texas_Camper

    Texas_Camper New Member

    Re: Camper and tow vehicle

    That listed weight, 5210 lbs is the BASIC DRY WEIGHT of the trailer without any options. When you add a/c, awning, full propane tanks, television set, and anything else (sometimes the spare tire is considered "optional") you can get heavy. Then add groceries, clothing, linen, toileteries, coffeemaker, m/w oven you'll get up to 6500 lbs rather quickly.
    Be very sure your tow vehicle is adequate (not only in tow capacity, but wheelbase).
     
  4. Grandview Trailer Sa

    Grandview Trailer Sa Senior Member

    Re: Camper and tow vehicle

    NO, the weight sticker that is in the trailer is the weight of that trailer WITH options. A brochures weight statement is without options. You do have to add food, clothes, TV, etc. I don't think you will add over 500lbs. until you add water. Most people do not travel with a full tank of fresh water unless you are going to "dry camp".

    If you want to know if you are overloading your truck, read your owner manual. There you will find a statement from Ford saying what you can tow. I would not exceed that weight or even match it, but that is what you can tow. Remember, you have to stop it also.
     
  5. DL Rupper

    DL Rupper Senior Member

    Re: Camper and tow vehicle

    You also have to go up long, long hills and then go down and stop at the bottom sometimes. Ask the dealer if you can take it for a trail run. If he says no, then you may have problems towing it after you purchase.
     
  6. hertig

    hertig Senior Member

    Re: Camper and tow vehicle

    Somewhere there will be a GVWR for the trailer. That is the maximum the trailer can be without risking warrantees and encouraging accidents. excessive wear or breakage, and lawsuits. You want to keep the GVWR of your trailer well under the towing capacity (GCVW of the truck minus actual weight of the truck.)

    Often the only way to tell is to visit a scale.

    GVWR = Gross Vehicle Weight Rating. GCWR = Gross Combined Weight Rating
     
  7. NINA

    NINA New Member

    Re: Camper and tow vehicle

    More Info: The real axel ratio is 3.55. Truck is a 5.0 ltr V8. Apparently it has a high toruque 302 motor.
    We believe there is a trans cooler. Hope this helps everyone give me some more information. :)
     
  8. DL Rupper

    DL Rupper Senior Member

    Re: Camper and tow vehicle

    Hey NINA, I think the high axle ratio (3.55) is too high for towing. You want lower axle ratios (4.10) for keeping the rpm's higher when towing. Also 302 V8's back in 1991 didn't produce much torque. They were more concerned with horse power, which doesn't mean much when towing. Common sense tells me, without the truck/trailer weight data, a 28 foot TT is too big for your F-150.
     

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