Driving in snow/ice

Discussion in 'General RVing' started by h2ojoe, Mar 14, 2009.

  1. h2ojoe

    h2ojoe New Member

    We just bought a 2008 Chinook Concourse 21' motorhome. How do rigs this size handle on snowy roads (Cascades of Oregon)? Are chains mandatory or do they handle well with good snow tires? Does anyone run studs on their rigs in the winter?
    Thanks for any input. We can't wait to get on the road.
     
  2. TexasClodhopper

    TexasClodhopper Senior Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    Hey Joe! Welcome to the forum!

    Snow? Snow!? ... What most people do with their RVs in the winter is ... park 'em! :clown:

    PS. I can't really imagine an MH with chains, but I'm from Texas!
     
  3. rjf7g

    rjf7g Senior Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    Welcome to the forum, Joe. I am like Tex, I can't imagine driving my camper with chains. My Dad drove at 18 wheeler for over 30 years and his company policy was to park their rigs if chains were required...
     
  4. LEN

    LEN Senior Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    I guess Alot has to do with what you are using the MH for. If skiing you will need chains. If your just traveling back and forth wait until no chains are needed. The MH's Do handle I feel better in snow and ice than a car. But heaven help you if you ever do slide. I have left the west side for a hunt on the east in Nov. with a fresh 6" of snow on the ground and towing ,the roads were mostly clear. After camping and hunting a couple days here came the snow again waking to 8" new and still coming. Packed up and got on the road, fell in behind the 18 wheeler's on the interstate and ran all the way home in 8" plus of new snow and I have to admit at 45 to 50 mph, what the trucks were doing, all went fine. You MUST carry chains on the mountain pass's even if you will never put them on. Would snow tires help, sure but unless your snow camping for recreation is there a cost benefit? If there were no way out I would run chains, but I don't for see this happening with the weather reporting we can get today. I'll just sit and wait it out for clear roads.

    Oh and welcome!

    LEN
     
  5. h2ojoe

    h2ojoe New Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    Thanks for your inputs. We are avid skiers and have been chasing winter storms in my AWD Astro van the last couple of years. It works but we are ready for more room and comfort, hence the purchase of the Chinook. We will be chasing snow storms and usually don't "park and wait it out" unless the roads are officially closed. Chains are great for occasional trips into the mountains but it sounds like studded tires (like on my van) are the way to go for routine driving in snow country. See you out there somewhere.
     
  6. elkhartjim

    elkhartjim Senior Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    From recent experience...chains (unless they are hooked to a wrecker) will not get you out of the mud. Morale is...stay on the hard stuff.
     
  7. utmtman

    utmtman Senior Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    I have driven my rig thru snowy roads, last year in Utah and in the Cascades of Washington. Common sense and drive the speed safe enough to keep you moving but not so fast you slide or spin out and you should be fine. Having grown up in snow country of Utah I have driven cars, trucks, and rvs thru snow many times and have learned if one goes too slow you get stuck and or spin and go no where and if you go too fast you tend to spin out and slide off roads but find that comfort zone between the two and you will be fine and the speed varys with every type of snow or ice condition.
     
  8. h2ojoe

    h2ojoe New Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    Thanks Lee & Fran. Sounds like the rules are the same as for any other vehicle. Do you have any special tires you run or just carry chains? I don't think studs are allowed in UT (we previously lived in SLC) but we use them on our vehicles in OR/WA due to their performance on icy roads. I will get some chains to carry us through the rest of this winter and will probably get an extra set of wheels with studs on them by next winter.
     
  9. utmtman

    utmtman Senior Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    My rig has the standard tires that came with it with the excepting I have replaced the front tires already but used the same size and brand as originals. I have never used chains or studs. With the exception of chains on a 4x4 on showy mountains while deer hunting in my younger days. With my personal vehicles I have always used all season radials except again when I had my 4x4 I used to have two sets of tires one all season for the summer and one heavy mud and snow for the winter but only cuz I did off roading and hunting. Those are now days gone by I traded off the 4x4 truck last year for a two wheel drive saturn vue.
     
  10. rddog8691

    rddog8691 Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    Two years ago i drove my father in laws new rig home, class A Damon, in a snow storm and i thought it handled the road conditions pretty well. I guess the added weight helps it get traction. I could tell you I did leave extra space between me and the cars traveling in front of me. :)
     
  11. Kirk

    Kirk Senior Member

    Re: Driving in snow/ice

    Keep in mind that when chains are required, that will apply to you also, so if you must travel when the road is open to traffic, having a pair is important. In addition, while it will be much like your past experiences, you will find that the heavier rig will tend to go better than your van, but it will take far more to stop it. Slick roads can be done safely if you use caution and understand the limits.

    I choose not to travel in bad weather today also, because I am retired and now full-time. But back when I used to work for a living(hate those four letter words!), I have traveled in bad weather many times. Good judgment is the key to safe travel, especially when weather gets ugly.
     

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