New RV'er

Discussion in 'General RVing' started by wvresq, Aug 7, 2004.

  1. wvresq

    wvresq New Member

    Hello to all! A new RV'er here. I have been a couple times with a very small homemade camper I purchased for my son and I, and we had a blast. Outside with nature and a campfire is the life for me :laugh:

    Anyway, I have recently gotten married and needed a bigger trailor, so I just purchased a 1977 Fleetwing from a friend of mine, and with a little cleaning and a few minor repairs my wife, son and I are ready to go. We plan to purchase a newer camper in a couple of years.

    My question to all of you veterans is this ... I would really like some input on what all I should stock my trailor with? What do you guys keep on hand? Rv accessories, cleaning supplies, food etc etc. I dont want to overstock, but I also would like to make sure I have what I need. Another concern I have is, I do not want to add any more weight than I have to.

    Any input would be appreciated. I look forward to a few trips before the season ends. Probably no more than 2/3 days here and there for now, but next season ... LOOK OUT !!! :laugh:

    I look forward to reading more on this forum from you experienced ppl, and maybe I can leave a post now and then on what I learn.

    Thanks to all.
  2. Ed H.

    Ed H. New Member

    New RV'er

    It all depends on your needs. Food enough for the time you'll be gone and basic kitchen gear to prepare it. This will vary with your tastes and culinary expertise. You can roast weiners over the camp fire or cook a gourmet meal or do anything in between.
    You definately need dish soap/rag/towel and personal hygene stuff ( don't forget an extra roll of TP). As far as cleaning the trailer goes, if it's only a weekend trip, a roll of paper towels to clean up spills might suffice and do the heavy cleaning back at home.
    As for accessories, blocks to level the trailer and jacks to stabilize it, a fresh water hose and a sewer hose ae the bare minimum. An extension cord is also a good idea as is any outdoor gear you will use (fishing tackle, folding chairs, etc.). If you go where there are sights to see, a camera may be handy or maybe binoculars.
    I like to take a change of clothng for each day plus a spare. Some folks can go a long weekend with what they leave home in, it all goes back to your preferences. A jacket and hat or some form of foul weather gear is always advisable too.
    Another thing to remember is a basic tool kit just in case you need to make emergency repairs (adjustable wrench, pliers, screw drivers, etc.)
    It is always a trick to feel out what you do and don't need. That will come with experience. A good rule of thumb is to empty all the stuff out of the trailer once in a while and only put back what you really will use (maybe not every trip, but often enough that it should be handy).
    There will be others who have other suggestion, but these should get you started. Above all, enjoy your travels.
  3. rlmurraysr59

    rlmurraysr59 New Member

    New RV'er

    Make sure you use rubber gloves when handling the drain hoses from the gray and black water tanks.

    Get a can of disinfectant to carry with you. Nice to make sure germs don't get you.

    I made up a check list on the computer to remind me of things I needed to do. Like put the antennae down. A lot of people, including me, learn this the hard way.

    Also to drop one side of the awning if you leave your trailer to go sight seeing. If a rain storm should come up and your awning is level you will come back to an awning that will have to be replaced. I learned this one the hard way too. I called the campground and asked them to go to the site where I was parked and let my awning down but they must have thought it was funny or didn't want to get wet. When I got back I had a broken roller tube and torn canvas.

    Have a good time and look forward to more suggestions. This website is great.
  4. JN

    JN New Member

    New RV'er

    I've seen some people Put 10 pound weights on there awning they just tie them with nylon rope and let them hang. It seemed to work for them but i wouldn't recommend it cause those weights could start to swing. Other just tie it down to a rock or slabe of wood near by. If i leave to go fishing or head to town and i think theres gonna be some wind picking up i just take it down its quick and easy and will save you some money.
  5. JN

    JN New Member

    New RV'er

    Cause I goto Convict lake once a year in northern CA, and i've seen a few awnings get ripped straght off the rv from the rain storms up there. Another good idea is if your in a canyon type place or serounded by hills the wind mostly comes in one derection so just Park the RV with the Awning the other way.. THATS my Awning advice Enjoy :laugh: :laugh:

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