Repair of Class C

Discussion in 'Class C Motorhomes' started by Blueeyes, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. Blueeyes

    Blueeyes New Member

    We recently found that a leak(that we did not know we has as it was seeping into an upholstered bar by the mattress) around the window over the bed area of our class c gulfstream conquest has probably damaged the wall of the sleeping area. I wanted to take out the window & fill in the hole and replace the entire front panel but the body shop that we took it to recommended just taking out the window & resealing. He is going to replace any damaged wood also. However, do you all think this will really fix the problem? We had always kept it caulked around the window since we bought the motorhome(used).

    Also, would you spend this kind of money on a 1997 model with 130, 000 miles. Right now everything runs fine both in the motorhome part & the truck motor but I know it is getting older.

    Thanks for any opinions.
     
  2. rjf7g

    rjf7g Senior Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    What kind of estimate are they giving you? A friend of mine was quoted $13,000 for an entire rebuild of his bunk area. When they moved to "fix the leak and make it usable again" the price tag dropped to $2,000. I put about $600 in to a bunk repair on my class C. I know he is not going to know the extent of the damage until he gets in there, but I would ask for a worst case scenario quote and decide from there --
     
  3. Blueeyes

    Blueeyes New Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    Thanks for your response. His estimate was 800 to 1,000.
     
  4. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    Price sound reasonable but hope he finds no unexpected damage.
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Re: Repair of Class C

    Agreed to both of u ,, and i hope it's a steel skeleton structure and not wood ,, that would be bad and more $$$ :eek: :(
     
  6. H2H1

    H2H1 Senior Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    I agreed with Becky, get the worst scenario estimate so you want be shocked when the bill come in. AND if it come come in much less you will feel better. Good luck and get back out enjoying camping
     
  7. Blueeyes

    Blueeyes New Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    Thanks for everyone's replies. Sorry I haven't responded sooner but I have been working long hours at the tax preparation office where I work during tax season. I am going to take my rv to the body shop when he has an open bay. Am hoping that the rot is not too bad. I still have reservations that this repair will permantly fix the problem. I would prefer to take out the window entirely but can't find a shop in this area that will do the work.
     
  8. tahitipetey

    tahitipetey New Member

    RE: Repair of Class C

    I'm in the same boat...or should i say water bed. Who ever desinged the windows in the front bunk should have to wear cement shoes in the pool.
    I agree with you Blue Eyes, you would think it would be a lot less hassle just to remove and cover.
    thanks for sharing your price quote with us. I'm going to have to get mine looked at in the spring.
    Right now it's tarped until the snow goes.
     
  9. Blueeyes

    Blueeyes New Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    Thanks for your reply, tahitipetey. Good luck with your repair.
     
  10. tahitipetey

    tahitipetey New Member

    RE: Repair of Class C

    Does anyone know if you could use eternabond tape or a product similar around the window frame?
    If possible it would be a cheap fix.
     
  11. saintanne

    saintanne New Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    I'm in the wrong business.....

    I just completely gutted and rebuilt the bunk on my '79 Tioga for around $120 in materials and 2 days labor. Pulled out everything, removed and resealed all outside corner beads and added a new rain gutter strip to the top edge of the entire camper as well (that was about $100 extra). Also, welded in new 1 1/4" square tube steel frame under the bunk area for support. Replaced all paneling and 3/4" plywood bunk floor.

    Anyhow, pulling a window and recaulking/reinstalling is kind of a simple repair. I would suggest giving it a shot yourself, or if you have a handy neighbor, let them give it a try. The worst that can happen is that you have to take it in to have it finished off or redone. Might save yourself $500. Anyhow, it might be worth the gamble.

    Best wishes!
     
  12. C Nash

    C Nash Senior Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    2 days labor at 8 hr per day and 85 bucks per hr adds up to about $1360.00 plus tax and materials if having the work done. :eek: :laugh: Guess the guy was giving them a pretty good price :laugh:
     
  13. saintanne

    saintanne New Member

  14. schizm

    schizm New Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    Hi saintanne,

    Do you have any pictures of your deconstruction/reconstruction of your overhead bunk rebuild? I am on my way out the door to start removing the floor of the bunk in my 1984 Midas Freeport which has the same problem. Any tips would be great.
     
  15. saintanne

    saintanne New Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    Hello Schizm:

    I'd be happy to share my experience with you. Unfortunately, I didn't even think of taking pictures.

    My first and most important pointer is, before you begin, make sure you've properly identified the leak(s)! We all know these are notorious for leaks, but I can only speak for my own experience. I thought I had properly assessed the situation and repaired a leak at the roof seam above my bunk. After I was done remodeling, I discovered a second leak from the side window which caused slight water damage to my rebuild work. Never underestimate the ability for water to move about and infiltrate nearly anything. It's all fixed now, though, and water tight!

    My second pointer is sort of common sense also, but make sure you pull out ALL rotted wood. In my '79, the plywood was so badly rotted away, it was like composted manure (smelled a bit like it too! Whoooo-ee!). I cut back about 4-5 inches beyond the rot to make sure I got it all. Then, I doused it good with Fantastic spray to kill the mold and then ran a radiant space heater in the bunk are for 3 days to dry it all out. I didn't want any water trapped in there! It was dry as a bone when I put new materials in.

    After ripping everything out of the bunk (paneling, decking, etc), I realized I have a metal frame all around the rv. This allowed me to weld 1 1/4" square tube steel from one side to the other across the bunk area to form a new substrate to which to attach a new 3/4" plywood deck. In the gap that was formed below the new bunk deck, I packed in fiberglass insulation to help insulate the sleeping area.

    While I was at it, I built in 3/4" plywood walls flanking the entrance to the bunk area. Don't know if you know where I mean, but if you look at your bunk from inside the RV, far to the right and left, there is usually a gap above the bunk mattress and below the overhead storage bins that is filled with a curtain. In those places, I installed plywood for stability, some privacy, and as a place to attach pictures or other wall hangings. I glued decorative paneling to both sides and an edge molding to dress it up a bit. Turned out pretty derned nice, if I do say so myself.

    Anyhow, I'll attach current pictures if I can figure out how to do it. I wish you luck. If you have a pressing question, don't be afraid to send it my way!

    SA
     
  16. TexasClodhopper

    TexasClodhopper Senior Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    Mike, nice description. Use the forum's 'Album' feature (in the blue stripe at the top) to post some pictures. Then come back here to tell us when they are available.
     
  17. BGR

    BGR New Member

    Re: Repair of Class C

    This is an old thread I know, but I have the same problem and want to repair myself. My 1888 Tioga Arrow has rotted floor around the drivers side edge, where the screws keeping the metal trim in place have all rusted and rotten in the wood and it is coming apart. Is it feasible to replace part of the floorboard or should the entire plywood floor be replaced for structural rigidity? Right now I cannot tell what holds this floor up, like whether it sits on some sort of frame, but I didn't see one when removing the trim and pulling the skin away.

    What is the best way to go about replacing the floor? Do you approach this from the inside after removing paneling and trim above the plywood or from below after removing all metal trim plate, screws, and pulling back the skin? That looks difficult as the skin (mine is of the older, corrugated style) seems to be in two sections that are seamed, but I cannot tell how the back piece is attached to the wall above the back top of the van cab.
     

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