what do you look for in mechanic/shop?

#1
I own a repair shop in Western North Carolina and I'm surrounded by RV parks. We primarily do maintenance, repair, performance, and detailing on 1/2 to 1 ton gas and diesel trucks. I've had some great customers from these local parks and they really inspired me to try to service this community better. So my question is, what do you look for? What are those things that would help you the most while traveling? Thanks in advance!
 

C Nash

Senior Member
#2
As a former auto tech, instructor the most important thing i learned was honesty to customers. Try to be prompt on time and charge fair prices. Most customers will or dont mind paying higher prices for quality work. If you make a mistake and we do admit it to customer and make it right. Explain as best you can what you will or expect to have to do to fix a problem. Electrical problems can be hard. You may spend hrs diagnosing and then short time fixing. Be fair but you have to be paid for time spent. Good luck. Good techs are hard to find
 
#3
Thanks for the response. Honesty and integrity are the most important thing for us. But other those things, what items are the most common that you find that you need while traveling? oil changes? brakes? bulbs? batteries? tires? how many are DIY'ers and how many aren't? I dont travel with my camper anymore so I feel a little disconnected.
 

C Nash

Senior Member
#4
Brakes, belts hose and lot of rvers are in the dark when it comes to winterizing. Tires are a big concern as some think as long as treads are good they ok. Not replace after 5 to 7 yr and the crappy tires that come on most get them off. Proper sealing and inspection of foofs are often neglected. I do most all my on repair. O2 HR 32 ft on ford chassis been back to dealer twice for water leak which i eventually found myself. I understand leaks can be very hard to find. Might offer a rv class 101 lol. It amazes me that people are buying and dealers are not really going over the normal things. New owners are excited and just think its get in and go. Read your manuals and all the material on appliances. Good luck
 
#5
as i drive by. is the lot clean? many auto, etc. just parked?
hows the restroom? matters to me.
is the place busy? just standing around?
then how the owner talks to me. (sales man/service writer if need be).
is the shop able to handle my rig? diesel knowledgeable, rv know how. or just a high-school drop out parts replacer.

then if a comeback how will they treat me.
i must feel good when i leave there lot. if not then they get bad words from me. word of mouth is far better than a PAID for ad.
 

C Nash

Senior Member
#6
I have seen some "high school drop outs" that were top notch techs. Then i've seen some with patches all down their sleeve that could talk it but not fix it.
 

C Nash

Senior Member
#8
Understand what you meant packrat. Kids need at least a high school or GED deplomy. At the dealer I worked and had to hire a deplomy was required. I did slip some drop outs through that were just hardship causes. Several I did get them to at least get thhir GED.
 
#9
a high school diploma is really nothing, but it does say something to a future employer.
i have know some that never made it past the 9th grade, and are top in there "class" in doing there thing. (not just automotive).
but sad most are one foot out of prison. or a grave.
my ex brother in-law, had the gift of art, he could just think and make a master work of art. but he would rather get high.
last i saw of him he was living in a ditch, drooling all over himself. such a loss.
 
#10
We just went through this with a mechanic over the holiday.

When looking for mechanics we first look at online reviews to see what others experiences are. Then follow up by calling each of them and getting an idea of how they charge for a service (EX: an oil change).

From the conversations and reading other peoples experiences gives us a good idea on how they are to work with.
 
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